pxhvjbbu

The Hitchhikers Guide to Dementia

first_imgby, Dr. Al Power, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShareShareEmail0 Shareshitchhiker__s_guide_to_the_galaxy_wallpaper_by_demi_feind-d558535 Artwork by D_Nikolaos of VGBoxartLike most people, I am subject to a regular barrage of media reports, coming from radio, television, internet news outlets, social media and daily RSS feeds. And here is what this information stream has taught me:If I eat blueberries, I’ll lower my risk of Alzheimer’s. Or was that tomatoes? It now appears that yogurt lowers the risk as well—does that mean blueberry yogurt, or will any old flavor do? Maybe I should have coconut flavored yogurt, because apparently, if all that coconut oil doesn’t kill me with a heart attack, it may make my brain healthier.And now it appears I may have to replace my plumbing, because a new study suggests that too much copper causes Alzheimer’s; though other medical studies have shown that a high copper intake actually lowers the risk. So which is it? And is lead involved? (I need to know because I tend to chew on my pencils when I do my daily Sudoku puzzles.)And then there’s the glucose connection, the blood pressure connection, the inflammatory connection, the brain reserve connection, the mood disorder connection, the social connections connection.And what kind of a teenager was I? Apparently, certain adolescent behaviors raise your risk. One of them is getting drunk; well, thank God, none of us ever did that! Also, it’s a risk if you have a history of adolescent antipsychotic use. (Tell that to the psychiatrists who are finding all kinds of new reasons to prescribe these drugs to young people, from depression to “oppositional disorders”.)Another risk factor (cue Randy Newman) is being too short. Time to get out the gravity boots? And if that weren’t bad enough, now the folks in Manhattan say dementia can come from exposure to bacterial and viral infections. (Someone sneezed on me just the other day, and I swear my ADAS-Cog score dropped two points!)Okay everyone, are you listening to me?? STOP! Just…stop. If there were a “Hitchhiker’s Guide to Dementia”, the first words would still be: “Don’t panic.” Time…to…take…a…deep…breath.What we have here is a collection of illnesses closely tied to the aging process, and a sequence of changes that may begin decades before we show any outward signs. And we are dissecting all the minutiae of the millions of things we do, eat, drink or experience in our lives—trying to find connections, however tenuous, that we can shoot to the media outlets to fuel the frenzy.There are a lot of people making money off of our hysteria and paranoia. But it’s much worse than that.You see, the more we fuel this kind of panic, the more we demonize the condition; and consequently, the more we demonize and dehumanize people who live with cognitive disability. Folks like Dr. Bill Thomas have long warned us that those people who do less or produce less are devalued in our society. It is also now clear that a similar fate befalls those who remember less in our hyper-cognitive, technology-obsessed world.Here are a couple of known facts to keep in mind: We all die. Many of us who live to a ripe old age will experience changes in various organ functions and capabilities. Many of us will become forgetful as we reach our later years. Those who do are not bad people.There is so much emphasis on “successful aging” these days—what does that mean? Are you successful if you run marathons until you are 96 and then die in your sleep, or at the completion of some incredible sexual escapade? That’s romantic, but highly subjective and unlikely. More important, this fixation on how we end our lives not only threatens to devalue who we are in our last years, but also how we have lived all of the earlier days of our lives.And if you don’t make it to the grave with all of your organ functions intact (an oxymoron in itself), what is that called? “Failed aging”? What about people born with developmental disabilities or congenital illness? They would be “failed agers” from the very start. No need to even give them blueberries and yogurt, I guess.You and I will always be more than the sum of what we can do and what we can remember. So here’s the advice I would put in my “Hitchhiker’s Guide”:No matter who you are or how you live your life, you have a chance of becoming forgetful as you age. You risk is never zero, but no one knows your exact “number”. You can almost certainly lower that risk somewhat if you eat well, exercise and do things that are good for your body, mind, and spirit; your risk will probably go up if you abuse any of those. But being obsessive about every little thing you do will likely not improve your odds to a greater extent than healthy moderation.Find that “sweet spot” that gives you a life worth living. When we stop indulging the fear mongers, we can see the value in people of all abilities. This will help us to visualize a true path to well-being for all.Related PostsGood for the Heart is Good For the BrainI generally avoid posting news about the latest food, vitamin, supplement, or lifestyle factor that may or may not affect your risk of dementia, for better or worse.Alzheimer’s Stigma and Self-Fulfilling PropheciesA new study from UCSD demonstrates the potential of self-fulfilling prophecy for those who live in a world with a highly stigmatized view of dementia.Latest Alzheimer’s From The Inside Out NewsletterThe latest edition of Richard Taylor’s newsletter Alzheimer’s From the Inside Out was published today. If you want a deeper understanding of dementia, and the people who live with it, I highly recommend you become a subscriber by clicking here. Here’s what Richard has to say about the latest research…TweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: Alzheimers Dementia media Successful Aginglast_img read more

pxhvjbbu

Longterm use of cannabis or cannabisbased drugs can impair memory shows study

first_imgJul 23 2018Long-term use of either cannabis or cannabis-based drugs impairs memory say researchers.The study has implications for both recreational users and people who use the drug to combat epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and chronic pain.They found that mice exposed to the drug long-term had “significant … memory impairments” and could not even discriminate between a familiar and novel object.There is little understanding of the potential negative side effects of long-term cannabinoid exposure, though it is already known that heavy, regular cannabis use increases the risk of developing mental health problems including psychosis and schizophrenia.More and more people are using the drug long-term due to its legalisation in several countries, while more potent varieties are available for recreational users.Researchers from Lancaster and Lisbon Universities studied the effects of the cannabinoid drug WIN 55,212-2 in mice and found that: Dr Neil Dawson, the lead researcher from Lancaster University said “This work offers valuable new insight into the way in which long-term cannabinoid exposure negatively impacts on the brain. Understanding these mechanisms is central to understanding how long-term cannabinoid exposure increases the risk of developing mental health issues and memory problems.”Related StoriesStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskHe also highlighted the relevance of the work to those using cannabinoid-based therapies to treat medical conditions.”Cannabis-based therapies can be very effective at treating the symptoms of chronic diseases such as epilepsy and multiple sclerosis, and dramatically increase the quality of life for people living with these conditions. We need to understand the side effects that these people may experience so that we can develop new interventions to minimise these side effects”.Professor Ana Sebastiao, lead researcher at the University of Lisbon, said: “Importantly, our work clearly shows that prolonged cannabinoid intake, when not used for medical reasons, does have a negative impact in brain function and memory. It is important to understand that the same medicine may re-establish an equilibrium under certain diseased conditions, such as in epilepsy or MS, but could cause marked imbalances in healthy individuals.”As for all medicines, cannabinoid based therapies have not only beneficial disease-related actions, but also negative side effects. It is for the medical doctor to weight the advantages of the therapy, taking into consideration quality of life and diseases progression, against the potential side effects.”The research was published in the Journal of Neurochemistry and was conducted as part of the European Commission Horizon 2020 funded SynaNET (http://www.synanet2020.com) project. Long-term exposure impairs learning and memory in the animals Brain imaging studies showed that the drug impairs function in key brain regions involved in learning and memory Long-term exposure to the drug impairs the ability of brain regions involved in learning and memory to communicate with each other, suggesting that this underlies the negative effects of the drug on memorycenter_img Source:http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/news/how-cannabis-and-cannabis-based-drugs-harm-your-brainlast_img read more

pxhvjbbu

New study focuses on promise of gene therapy for Amish nemaline myopathy

first_imgAug 14 2018A new comprehensive natural history study about Amish nemaline myopathy (ANM) in the Old Order Amish population focuses on the promise of gene therapy for this lethal disorder. Amish nemaline myopathy (ANM) is an infantile-onset muscle disease linked to a mutation of the TNNT1 gene. The study summarizes genealogical records, clinical data, and molecular reports of one hundred and six ANM patients born between 1923 and 2017 and was led by researchers from the Clinic for Special Children in Strasburg, PA. It appeared this month in the journal Human Molecular Genetics.All ANM patients in the study were born at a normal birth weight, failed to thrive by 9 months of age, and died at a median age of 18 months from respiratory failure. Progressive deformity of the chest wall has led to the disorder to commonly be referred to as “chicken breast disease”. Symptoms of ANM shortly after birth include low muscle tone, hip and shoulder stiffness, and tremors, followed by progressive muscle weakness, degeneration and joint contractures. ANM has a carrier frequency of 6.5% in the Old Order Amish population and because the community is reluctant to use costly or invasive life-sustaining technologies for an otherwise lethal disorder, the natural history of the disease was observed without interventions.Muscle biopsies from two ANM patients showed an abnormal pattern of muscle fibers with preserved nerve function. Researchers compared the human ANM muscle biopsies with those from a transgenic mouse model; they were very similar, suggesting the mice can serve as a good model of the human disease. At the Clinic for Special Children, genetic testing allows practitioners to confirm the diagnosis of ANM within days of birth. The findings in this study provide a strong platform for exploring gene replacement therapy in newborns diagnosed with ANM.​Source: http://clinicforspecialchildren.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/CSC-TNNT1-Press-Release_8.12.18.pdflast_img read more

pxhvjbbu

Phonaks new smallest and most discreet Virto BTitanium hearing aid

first_imgThe Virto B-Titanium is the smallest and most discreet custom hearing aid Phonak has ever produced. Compared to traditional acrylic, titanium shells are 15X stronger and 50% thinner. A thinner shell allows for deeper placement in the ear canal, resulting in a more discreet fit. This makes Virto B-Titanium an ideal solution for first-time hearing aid wearers, 62% of whom prefer an invisible hearing aid.Virto B-Titanium also provides outstanding hearing performance. It contains AutoSense OS for a fully automatic and effortless listening experience. AutoSense OS accurately captures and analyzes the sound environment, then precisely blends feature elements from multiple programs in real time. When compared to manual programs, use of AutoSense OS improves speech understanding by 20% in everyday listening situations.Virto B-Titanium achieved an IP68 rating for resistance to both water and dust and was recently honored as a 2018 Red Dot Award Winner for excellence in product design.The ChallengeRelated StoriesPhonak and Advanced Bionics to launch innovative microphone technologyThe engineers at Phonak were challenged with making the tiny Virto B-Titanium even tinier and more discreet. They decided to focus on how to increase “ear candidacy” for the product, which ultimately led them to re-examine the ear impression-taking process. Traditional ear impressions typically only involve injecting impression material into the ear canal. Unfortunately, ear impressions are static and an impression alone does not take into account the natural flexibility of the ear canal.Enter the Titanium FitGuide, a new tool for hearing care professionals (HCPs) that has been proven to give more than 50% of patients a deeper fitting by an average of 2.5mm. The tool is made of pure medical-grade titanium and has two modular ends—one for patients who require a moderate receiver and another for those who need a power receiver. The HCP inserts the appropriate module into the patient’s ear to reach a depth that is both deep but comfortable. The HCP notes the depth in millimeters, which is etched onto the stem of the tool.In addition to the Titanium FitGuide, professionals may also use the 2018 Red Dot Award-winning EasyView Otoblock when taking an impression for the Virto B-Titanium. The EasyView Otoblock provides visualization for the deepest ear impression possible. Along with the availability of this deep impression, the additional data gained from the Titanium FitGuide ensures Phonak’s 3D modelers build the smallest, most discreet Virto B-Titanium.The new and improved Virto B-Titanium will be available August 27 in 17 countries (Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States) with two additional module colors and new venting options. Aug 14 2018The small and discreet Virto B-Titanium custom hearing aid becomes even tinier and more discreet thanks to a new tool for hearing care professionals called the Titanium FitGuide.In February of 2017, Phonak announced production of the Virto B-Titanium hearing aid. Virto B-Titanium remains the world’s only mainstream custom hearing aid made of premium medical-grade titanium. Virto B-Titanium combines the many benefits of titanium—including superior strength and an extra lightweight—together with the latest 3D printing technology. Source:https://www.phonak.com/center_img Virto B-Titaniumlast_img read more

pxhvjbbu

Luna moths tails fool bat sonar

first_imgThe green wings of the luna moth, with their elegant, long tails, aren’t just about style. New research finds they also help save the insect from becoming a snack for a bat. The fluttering tails appear to create an acoustic signal that is attractive to echolocating bats, causing the predators to zero in on the wings rather than more vital body parts. Scientists pinned down the tails’ lifesaving role by taking 162 moths and plucking the tails off 75 of them. They used fishing line to tether two moths—one with tails, the other without—to the ceiling of a darkened room. Then, they let loose a big brown bat. The bats caught 81% of the tailless moths, but just 35% of those with fully intact wings, they report in a study published online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. High-speed cameras helped show why. In 55% of attacks on moths with tails, the bats went after the tails, often missing the body. It’s the first well-documented example of an organism using body shape to confuse predators that use echolocation, the researchers say—the equivalent of fish and insects that display giant eyespots for visual trickery.(Linked video credit: Barber Lab, Boise State University)last_img read more

pxhvjbbu

Top stories Chimps versus drones vampire squirrels and how to avoid a

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Scientists have captured what may be the first video of the remarkable and rare “vampire” squirrel! The little creature is twice the size of most tree squirrels, reputedly has a taste for blood, and has the bushiest tail of any mammal compared with its body size.Lack of sleep puts you at higher risk for colds, first experimental study findsMoms have stressed the importance of solid shuteye for years, especially when it comes to fighting off colds. Now, they’ve got science on their side. A new study reveals that sleep-deprived people are more than four times likelier to catch a cold than their well-rested counterparts.PubPeer’s secret is out: Founder of controversial website reveals himselfAfter 3 years in the shadows, the anonymous founder of the popular—and controversial—website PubPeer has revealed himself. 41-year-old neuroscientist Brandon Stell set up the site for users to critique published research. He’s going public in the hopes of raising funding to improve and expand the site.Chimps destroy documentary drone with twig toolsMove over, King Kong! Tushi, a chimp living in a Netherlands zoo, recently knocked a filmmaker’s drone clear out of the sky using long stick. Scientists say the action shows planned, deliberate tool use and that chimps can think ahead and be creative in their toolmaking.Tiny ant takes on pesticide industryWant an alternative to pesticides? Try ants. A new study reveals that in many situations, weaver ants are both better and cheaper than chemical sprays at keeping pests away.center_img The surprising reason some people’s muscles suddenly turn into boneA rare disease called fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva can suddenly turn a person’s tissues and muscles into bone, permanently immobilizing parts of their bodies. Now, scientists have finally figured out why that happens—and found a promising new treatment.‘Vampire’ squirrel caught on film Emaillast_img read more

pxhvjbbu

New Mexico says no to wolves creating quandary for federal officials

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A new political battle is brewing over Mexican wolves, a species that was hunted and poisoned to extinction in the U.S. Southwest, but reintroduced to the wild by the federal government in 1998. Earlier this week, the New Mexico Game  Commission upheld an earlier decision denying the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) permits to release Mexican wolves onto federal land in southwestern New Mexico. According to FWS and independent scientists, such releases are critical for diversifying the gene pool of the increasingly inbred wolf population.State officials have said they are unwilling to approve new releases until FWS updates its recovery plan for the wolf, which was written in 1982. Concerned about impacts to ranchers and elk hunters, they’ve pressed FWS for the total number of wolves it aims to restore to the landscape in the long-term. But the agency doesn’t have that number yet, and though it is updating the recovery plan, the process is likely to take at least 2 years.  Now, the federal agency must decide whether to release the wolves against the state’s wishes. Federal policy requires FWS to consult state agencies and comply with their permitting processes when releasing endangered animals from captivity, even when releases are made on federal land. But there’s one exception: If a state agency prevents the service from fulfilling its statutory responsibilities, the feds can go over the state’s head. In this case, “our responsibility is to recover the Mexican wolf,” says FWS spokesman Jeff Humphrey. “Our recovery could be stalled, at best, by failing to be able to insert a more diverse gene pool into the existing wild population.” Still, the agency is remaining vague about its next move. The agency’s top brass would have to reach a formal decision that it can’t recover the wolf without new releases for them to proceed without the state’s blessing, Humphrey says.Long controversyThe effort to restore wolves to the Southwest has always been mired in controversy. In the Northern Rockies, gray wolves were reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park, a large protected area where neither cattle grazing nor big game hunting are allowed. In the case of the Mexican wolf, however, the 18,100-square-kilometer recovery area straddling Arizona and New Mexico is national forest land that is both grazed and hunted, which has increased human conflict with the animals.Over the years, the feds have made concessions to the states. In the beginning, for example, New Mexico rejected the release of captive animals within its borders (though wolves could wander in on their own), so the feds didn’t try. But because most of the recovery area is in New Mexico, that left only a small swath of Arizona for the animals. Wolves populated that area fairly quickly, making it difficult to make additional releases, which became few and far between. On top of that, any wolves that roamed outside the official recovery area were captured and kept in captivity, or released back into their approved wild habitat. Wolves that killed cattle also were removed from the wild, sometimes by killing them. Wolves were poached, and some were baited by ranchers to predate on cattle and violate a “three strikes” rule, which allowed the feds to kill them.Inbreeding concernsWhen wolves were removed from the wild, however, their genetic value to the population was never considered. And a series of removals in the mid-2000s left only one pack on the landscape that had high reproductive success, says Rich Fredrickson, an independent population geneticist based in Missoula, Montana, who serves on the recovery team.That pack’s dominance has created inbreeding problems. The individuals in the wild population today are, on average, as related as siblings, Fredrickson says. “This is the poster child, in my mind at least, in North America for the need to pay close attention to genetic management,” he says.Last year, FWS biologists estimated the population of Mexican wolves at 109 animals, the highest it’s been since reintroduction and double its size in 2010. It’s important to try to diversify the gene pool while the population is still small, biologists say; the larger it gets, the less likely management actions are to be effective.The agency had hoped to introduce some greater genetic diversity this summer by “cross-fostering” pups; that’s a process in which pups born in the wild are removed from dens and replaced with pups born in captivity. It also wanted to release a mating pair currently being held at the Sevilleta Wolf Management Facility in La Joya, New Mexico, if they had pups.New Mexico says noA federal rule change earlier this year opened the door for releases in New Mexico, and also expanded the territory where wild wolves would be allowed to roam. But in June, Alexa Sandoval, director of New Mexico’s Department of Game and Fish, declined to issue permits for the release of the mating pair, or cross-fostering pups, arguing that the feds have not provided specific criteria which must be met for recovery of the wolf to be considered successful, nor detailed the steps it must take to get there.     The Game Commission, a seven-member body appointed by the governor that oversees Sandoval’s agency and sets its policies, upheld her decision on 29 September after hearing an appeal from FWS last month. In August, the Arizona Game and Fish Commission also voted to not allow the release of adult wolves from captivity, but to allow as many as six pups per year to be cross-fostered.On its own, however, cross fostering won’t solve the wolves’ genetic woes, researchers say. For it to help at all, the pups have to survive and breed. “In general, lots of pups die in captivity and the wild,” Fredrickson says.Cross-fostering introduces additional complications: Genetically valuable pups must be born in captivity at almost exactly the same time as a wild litter, and managers have to closely monitor wild wolves to know that has happened. The pups then have to be swapped within 2 weeks of birth. “To the extent they can do cross-fostering, that’s great, but it’s not going to be enough,” Fredrickson says. “They need to increase releases.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

pxhvjbbu

WHO declares Ebola outbreak over

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The World Health Organization (WHO) today declared Liberia free of Ebola, marking the end of the outbreak in West Africa. “Today is a good day,” Rick Brennan, director of emergency risk management and humanitarian action at WHO, said at a press conference in Geneva, Switzerland. But he also urged continued vigilance, warning that there was a significant risk of flare-ups. “While this is an important milestone and an important step forward, we have to say that the job is still not done. That’s because there is still ongoing risk of re-emergence of the disease because of persistence of the virus in a proportion of survivors,” Brennan said.The announcement came 42 days after the last confirmed Ebola patient in Liberia twice tested negative for the virus. It is the first time that all known chains of transmission in the three Ebola-ravaged countries have been stopped. Sierra Leone was declared free of Ebola on 7 November 2015, and Guinea followed at the end of December 2015. All three countries are now in a 90-day period of heightened surveillance.The outbreak in West Africa was by far the largest Ebola on record and the only one to have become a full-fledged epidemic. More than 28,500 people were sickened by the virus, and 11,315 died since the outbreak began in a remote Guinean village in December 2013. At the height of the epidemic there were hundreds of infections every day, and patients died in front of overfilled treatment centers that had shut their doors. “Detecting and breaking every chain of transmission has been a monumental achievement,” Margaret Chan, director-general of WHO, said in a press statement. While this is an important milestone and an important step forward, we have to say that the job is still not done.Rick Brennan, WHO Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Email Because Ebola can persist in some tissues and bodily fluids of survivors for months, there is still a risk of the virus re-emerging. This is what happened in November 2015 in Liberia, after the country had been declared free of Ebola for the second time. There have been 10 such flare-ups that were not part of the original outbreak, Brennan said. “And we are expecting more.” The risk of such a re-emergence decreases over time, however, as more and more survivors clear the virus from their body. Scientists are most worried about Ebola’s persistence in the semen of survivors where it has been shown to be present for up to a year.As scientists and doctors move to discuss what they have learned from the deadliest Ebola outbreak on record, the virus’s uncanny ability to stick around in survivors is just one of many outstanding questions. Another is how to do better research during such emergencies. “The research activities during the outbreak yielded very little,” says Stephan Becker, a virologist at the University of Marburg in Germany. “We need to be prepared before such an outbreak starts.” Armand Sprecher of Doctors Without Borders in Brussels says African countries at risk for the next outbreak in particular need to strengthen their scientific and ethical review boards that evaluate and approve proposals. “I think it is doable, but it will require work, and I am not sure who will work on this,” Sprecher says.Much of the discussion has also focused on the role of WHO, which was heavily criticized for how it handled the outbreak, particularly in the beginning. There have been several reports recommending reforms, but even if those changes are implemented that may not be enough, Sprecher says. “WHO is not set up as a meritocracy, and unless the envisaged overhaul changes their governance structure, I am not sure that shuffling the cards and expanding their budget will make them into an organization that will be less disappointing next time.”But the most important lesson is the need to strengthen health care systems in low- and middle-income countries, says Anthony Fauci, who heads the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland. “If there was a system to have recognized and stopped the outbreak that began with the child in Guinea in December 2013, we might have avoided the explosive outbreaks in Sierra Leone and Liberia.”*Related content: “Ebola’s Thin harvest”—a special package examining the clinical research done during the Ebola epidemic.last_img read more

pxhvjbbu

Cholera vaccination campaign in Yemen is dropped

first_img By Meredith WadmanJul. 12, 2017 , 3:15 PM The government of Yemen has suspended a request for cholera vaccine to fight the deadly outbreak that since 27 April has infected a reported 320,199 Yemenis and killed 1742. One million doses of the vaccine had been allocated from a global stockpile and immunizations had been set to begin this month; now, the first half-million doses that were en route to the country will be rerouted to other at-risk countries.“Plans for a cholera vaccination campaign planned in Yemen have been suspended based on a decision of the government,” Tarik Jašarević, a World Health Organization (WHO) spokesperson in Geneva, Switzerland, wrote to ScienceInsider in an emailed statement, adding that the decision was made in consultation with Yemeni government partners, including WHO, which advises the Ministry of Health. The news was first disclosed during a press briefing by a United Nations aid committee in Geneva on 11 July.Jašarević noted that “in an outbreak setting, the impact of [oral cholera vaccine] is greatest when used to protect communities that are not yet affected. … There are few such areas in Yemen now.” Since the epidemic began last October, there have been cholera cases in 21 of 23 of Yemen’s governorates.  Cholera vaccination campaign in Yemen is dropped Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Email KHALED ABDULLAH/REUTERS/Newscom Among the many affected by cholera throughout Yemen, these infected children lie on the ground in a hospital in Sanaa. The move to drop the campaign reverses a difficult decision taken last month by the International Coordinating Group on Vaccine Provision, which agreed to ship out about half of its total supply of cholera vaccine to the war-torn country. The Yemeni government had requested 3.5 million doses from the group. Yemen has roughly 27 million people, half of whom are younger than 20. But the Yemeni government, with the help of a Saudi-led coalition, is battling Shiite Houthi rebels backed by Iran and there were concerns over whether the vaccine could be used effectively as battles raged in parts of the country, and whether administering it might distract health workers from treating patients, a cornerstone of epidemic response.  Even advocates of the vaccination plan concede that the government had few good options. “Vaccination was a good idea. But I also recognize that they are only able to secure a very small supply of vaccine and there are many competing priorities,” says Andrew Azman, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland, who in the last month has been part of a team advising WHO on how to allocate the cholera vaccine in Yemen.But some Yemeni physicians bemoaned the suspension of the campaign. They note that about 26 million Yemenis have not yet been infected. “It is important to protect these others—especially those in governorates not yet involved in this disaster,” says Abdul Rahim Al-Samie, an infectious disease doctor in the city of Taiz, Yemen. Al-Samie is also the general director of the Taiz Governorate Health Office, where 22,903 cases of cholera have been reported and 150 people have died since 27 April.To control the spread of cholera during an outbreak, rapid care for infected people is vital, including providing ready access to rehydration therapy—a huge challenge in a country where civil war has wreaked havoc on public health and other infrastructure. Azman says he expects tens of thousands more cases before the epidemic burns itself out. “They could have had a huge, huge impact if vaccination was done early, a few months ago,” he says. “Even now, though, if [vaccine was] targeted appropriately and rapidly, I have no doubt that cases would be averted and lives would be saved.”When oral hydration doesn’t work for the diarrheal disease, cholera, caused by the comma-shaped bacterium Vibrio cholera, can sometimes be treated by intravenous fluids and antibiotics. It is much riskier in malnourished people, as is common in Yemen, where hunger has compounded the miseries caused by the civil war.last_img read more

pxhvjbbu

Has a second person with HIV been cured

first_img Timothy Ray Brown, aka the “Berlin patient,” the only person to be cured of HIV, may finally have company. A decade after Brown became famous thanks to a stem cell transplant that eliminated his HIV infection, a similar transplant from a donor who has HIV-resistant cells appears to have cured another man, dubbed the “London patient.”“This is a big deal,” says Sharon Lewin, who heads the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity in Melbourne, Australia. “It tells us that Timothy Brown wasn’t a one-off.” Although the interventions that the two patients received could only be used on a tiny fraction of the 37 million HIV-infected people worldwide, their stories point to cure strategies that could be more widely applicable.To treat blood cancers, both HIV-infected men received stem cell transplants from people who carried a mutation in the gene for CCR5, a cell surface molecule that many HIV strains use to infect cells. Beforehand, each had been treated with toxic chemicals in a “conditioning” regimen meant to kill off their existing cancerous bone marrow cells. After HIV-resistant blood cells derived from the transplant supplanted the recipients’ vulnerable cells, the two patients stopped taking the antiretroviral (ARV) drugs that had been damping down their infections. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Jon CohenMar. 4, 2019 , 6:05 PM Daniel Jack Lyons Timothy Ray Brown’s HIV cure may no longer be unique. Email Brown remains uninfected as far as scientists can tell, and no HIV has been detected in the London patient’s blood for 18 months, save for one blip of viral DNA that researchers studying the man suspect was a false signal. The team also found that his white blood cells now cannot be infected with CCR5-dependent HIV strains, indicating the donor’s cells had engrafted.Virologist Ravindra Gupta at University College London, who is scheduled to describe the London patient’s case tomorrow at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, Washington, and online in Nature, resists using the term “cured” for the man, who remains anonymous. Gupta prefers to say the man is instead in long-term remission, in part because the team hasn’t looked at tissues other than the patient’s blood. “After 2 years, we’ll be talking more about ‘cure,’” Gupta says.Stem cell and bone marrow transplants haven’t cured the handful of other HIV-infected blood cancer patients who have received them. Some seemed to control the infection without ARVs for a period but later had the virus rebound or died from their leukemia or lymphoma. Gupta did not expect this transplant to work either. “It’s been 10 years since the last success, and I was totally prepared for failure of the graft or return of the lymphoma,” he says. Has a second person with HIV been cured? It’s great that I finally have someone added to my family. It’s been too long. In some of the past transplant failures, the donor did not have a mutated CCR5, but the conditioning regimen seemed to have significantly reduced the “reservoirs” of cells in the recipient that have latent HIV infections, invisible to the immune system. Brown, who required two transplants to cure his leukemia, had intensive chemical treatment and, on top of that, received whole body irradiation. The London patient, in contrast, had a milder regimen that targeted his lymphoma.“This case tells us that there is no magic conditioning regimen,” Lewin says. Brown and the London patient also suffered from graft-versus-host disease as the transplanted immune systems attacked other recipient tissues as foreign. That might have had the ironic benefit of further reducing HIV reservoirs, Lewin says.To learn more about the factors that favor a cure, amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research, a New York City–based foundation, in 2014 began to fund a consortium of international researchers who do transplants in HIV-infected people with blood cancers. The London patient is one of 40 in the study.Timothy Henrich, a clinician at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), has seen HIV bounce back in two patients who had a conditioning regimen that impressively knocked down HIV reservoirs but whose transplants came from donors with working CCR5s. “Durable engraftment” of the CCR5 mutants is key to a cure, he concludes.The London patient and Brown may point to ways to judge the success of a potential cure short of stopping ARVs and seeing whether the virus returns, says Rowena Johnston, who directs research at amfAR. Certain HIV antibodies and proteins declined in the blood of both men, she points out, which might offer a helpful early indicator of whether a cure strategy is working prior to stopping ARVs. “That could be a fantastic way forward,” Johnston says.Steven Deeks, an HIV researcher at UCSF, says the results could also boost cure efforts to cripple CCR5 “without the need for heroic interventions such as in the Berlin and London cases.” In one example, Pablo Tebas, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Pennsylvania, and his co-workers remove white blood cells from HIV-infected people and then knock out their CCR5 genes with a genome editor called zinc finger nucleases, a precursor to the better known CRISPR. The researchers expand the modified cells and then reinfuse them into their patients with the hope that they will engraft and populate the blood.In their latest small study, presented at CROI, Tebas’s team showed that in 15 patients who received this therapy and then stopped ARVs, HIV did rebound, but a few weeks slower than it does in people without such transplants. It’s far from a cure, but Tebas thinks coupling this approach with other interventions “might be the way of the future.”The news about the London patient also encourages Paula Cannon at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. “I did a little happy dance when I read the paper,” she says. Her group has been working on a way to mutate the CCR5 gene directly in the bone marrow of a person to simulate the effect of the transplants.“Even if we’re not going to cure the world with stem cell transplants,” Johnston says, “it’s important to have a collection of people who’ve been cured so we can put together that information to figure out how we can do a cure more broadly.”And Brown welcomes the London patient. “It’s great that I finally have someone added to my family. It’s been too long. I think it’s a movement in the right direction and proves that cure of HIV is possible but I think lots more work needs to be done to help everyone who is living with the virus,” he says. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Timothy Ray Brown last_img read more

pxhvjbbu

New Horizons reveals a snowman at the edge of the solar system

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Paul VoosenJan. 2, 2019 , 5:30 PM NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute MU69 appears to have few craters or other signs of violent impact, supporting the idea that the solar system’s building blocks formed when friction and gravity gently drew together clouds of dust and gravel—a theory known as pebble accretion. Closer to the sun, these building blocks would go on to form Earth, Mars, and all the other planets. But in the Kuiper belt, the region of icy bodies beyond Neptune, they formed but did not evolve further, said Jeff Moore, a planetary scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, and the mission’s geology lead. Kuiper belt objects “are the first planetesimals,” he said. “These are the only remaining basic building blocks.”Seeing one close up could clear up many debates. For example, comets that visit Earth from the Kuiper belt have had a peanutlike profile similar to MU69, prompting debate about whether they were sculpted by the sun’s heat or looked that way from the start. The latter now seems likely. “This really puts the nail in the coffin now,” Stern said. “We know this is how many objects like this form.” (The discovery also suggests the rubber-duck comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was actually the first contact binary to be explored by a spacecraft when the European Space Agency’s Rosetta visited it in 2014.)The MU69 story is only starting to unfold, Stern added. Less than 1% of the data has returned so far. More will be presented tomorrow, perhaps giving a better indication of its composition. New Horizons’s journey into the solar system’s past has just begun.*Correction, 3 January, 10:55 a.m.: This story has been updated to note that MU69 may not be the first contact binary visited by a spacecraft. LAUREL, MARYLAND—Humanity is getting its first good look at a primordial planetary building block, in images sent back by this afternoon by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft after its flyby of MU69, a small icy body at the far fringes of the solar system.For a half-year, the New Horizons team had puzzled over the possible shape of MU69, which was little more than an oblong dot in Hubble Space Telescope images. Is it two icy objects orbiting each other, or a single “peanut”? It turns out to be both. Resembling a 33-kilometer-long interplanetary “snowman,” in the words of Alan Stern, a planetary scientist from the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in Boulder, Colorado, and principal investigator for the $800 million mission, MU69 appears to have formed when two spherical objects gently smooshed together billions of years ago. Mutual gravitational attraction keeps them married despite their gentle, 15-hour rotation. “What you’re seeing is the first contact binary ever explored by a spacecraft,” Stern said today at a press conference here at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.The 140-meter-resolution image, taken 28,000 kilometers from MU69 half an hour before the spacecraft’s closest approach, reveals two bumpy, reddish spheres, with one three times the volume of the other. The object has a mottled look, with the bright patches concentrated in mysterious circles while the darker areas seem more linear. The “neck” between the two lobes is particularly bright, perhaps because small, reflective particles tumbled into its crevasse, said Cathy Olkin, a deputy project scientist and planetary scientist at SwRI. Although the photo doesn’t show shadows, MU69’s profile suggests it could have hills as tall as a kilometer. New Horizons reveals a ‘snowman’ at the edge of the solar system Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

pxhvjbbu

Fascinating portraits of immigrants at Ellis Island

first_imgIt was the very beginning of 1892 when the first 700 immigrants who had voyaged across the Atlantic, carried by three ships, were processed at the brand new Immigration Station at Ellis Island. By the end of that first year, roughly 450,000 more people passed through the Ellis Island checkpoint. The numbers just kept on growing. During the next 60 years, this place would be the stepping stone for millions of people who were chasing a dream, a chance for a better life in the New World.Waiting….Man from Algeria.Nestled at the mouth of the Hudson River, Ellis Island is remembered as an emotional place. There were tears of joy for all those who made it through, who perhaps were reunited with family members after years of separation.Girl from the Kochersberg region near Strasbourg, Alsace, c.1905.There were also tears of sorrow for those fewer who were not allowed passage by the Immigration Officers. Entry was usually denied due to a certain health condition or perhaps a criminal record.Bavarian man.The health and legal checks followed immediately after the ships docked. New arrivals would queue in lines and wait for the obligatory procedures. This step was crucial for their approval for entry to the United States.Wilhelm Schleich, a miner from Hohenpeissenberg, Bavaria.The luckiest, and wealthiest, immigrants waited up for only two hours, some up to five hours. But those who had something wrong were held on the island for days and sometimes even weeks.Dutch siblings from the Island of Marken, holding religious tracts.By the late 19th century the constellation of immigrants had significantly changed. There were less western Europeans such as Germans, Britons or Scandinavians. Less Irish too as the Potato Famine crisis was by then settled.American slang words we never knew were invented by the IrishA German stowaway.It was an era of new waves of immigrants, mainly journeying from the eastern or southern countries of Europe such as Italy, Slovakia, Russia, Albania, Romania, and Greece.Greek soldierSome people arrived from even more faraway places like Turkey and India.Guadeloupean woman, 1911.The photographs demonstrate the huge range of different nationalities and cultures who were permitted to settle in the United States. Only around 2% of applicants were deemed unfit to become citizens, however around one fifth were held for further medical investigation or a legal hearing.Italian woman.In a great many cases, people were escaping poverty or political unrest in their native countries. Some were pushed on the road to escape religious persecution.An Italian woman, c.1906.Whichever the reason, each person had to complete a 29 question interview. They were supposed to have at least $20 in their pocket, however the inspectors could use their discretion.Swedish children in Lapland costume.Rev. Joseph Vasilon, Greek-Orthodox priest.Ellis Island saw its heydey from 1900 until the outbreak of the World War One in 1914. During this period, it is estimated that at least 5,000 people a day, and sometimes even 10,000, lined up in the queues. It was a real mass migration.Romanian piper.On leaving Ellis Island, the new arrivals mostly spent some time in New York City or New Jersey until they figured out where to go next.Romanian shepherd, c.1906.Immigration rates dramatically dropped following two laws that were passed in the first half of the 1920s. The primary purpose was to restrict the overall levels of immigration to the United States, but they also placed limits according to ethnicity and religion.Russian Cossacks, armed and in full dress.First came the 1921 Emergency Quota Act, which allowed the implementation of the National Origins Formula. This was followed by the Immigration Act of 1924, including the Asian Exclusion Act and the National Origins Act.Three boys from Scotland.In the subsequent three decades — until Ellis Island officially closed in 1954 — approximately 2.3 million immigrants entered the U.S. via this route. Compared to some of the peak years at the start of the century, this number was nothing. For instance, around 1.25 million people showed up at Ellis Island in 1907 alone.Mother and her two daughters from Zuid-Beveland province of Zeeland, The Netherlands.During World War Two, Ellis Island was repurposed as a war hospital for wounded soldiers who returned home from the front lines. The facilities on the island also accommodated a prisoner of war camp.Three women from Guadeloupe.Since 1976, the island has been open to the public as a historic site which can be visited, including a tour at the Ellis Island Museum of Immigration.Read another story from us: Titanic Orphans: A father ‘kidnapped’ his two sons, boarded with false names and passed awayIt is said that at least a third of the current U.S. population is able to trace at least one of their family ancestors as back to the famed Ellis Island entry point.last_img read more

pxhvjbbu

England win Cricket World Cup

first_imgShareTweetSharePinA jubilant England team. Photo credit: BBCEngland beat New Zealand to win the men’s World Cup for the first time after one of the most amazing games of cricket ever played was tied twice.In an emotional and electric atmosphere at Lord’s, both sides scored 241 in their 50 overs and were level on 15 when they batted for an extra over apiece.It meant England were crowned world champions by virtue of having scored more boundary fours and sixes – 26 to New Zealand’s 17 – in the entire match.Read more…last_img read more

pxhvjbbu

Climate change prompts a rethink of Everglades management

first_imgRising sea levels threaten the diverse ecology of the Everglades. CERP, established by Congress in 2000, is a multidecadal effort to restore and better manage the Everglades, jointly run and funded by the federal government and the state of Florida. For the past 5 years, they’ve been jointly putting an average of $230 million per year into CERP projects, including efforts to eradicate invasive exotic plants and restore water patterns of water flow through the wetlands.But the new report points to a different set of concerns arising for the region: Sea levels have risen approximately 7 centimeters since 2000, and Southern Florida expects a 0.8-meter rise by 2100. Saltwater can have complicated and contradictory effects. It inundates plant life and degrades their roots, which promotes erosion, but it can also keep microbes from decomposing plant matter, which leads to a buildup of soil. Changing patterns of erosion and water surges could complicate CERP projects such as an effort to manage how fresh and saltwater are distributed across Biscayne Bay on Florida’s east coast.To account for the impacts of climate change, CERP should incorporate the most recent climate models, and should appoint an independent “Everglades lead scientist,” the report says, to make sure these models inform all CERP projects.Lake Okeechobee, the largest water source in the Everglades system, gets its own chapter in the report. The lake feeds estuaries and wetlands to the south, and is home to the Everglade snail kite, an endangered bird of prey. The report recommends closer monitoring and research on the lake’s levels to inform a new regulatory plan. Low water levels can minimize dangerous flooding and foster submerged vegetation. High levels, which ensure water for human use and natural preserves southward, also spread contaminants to cleaner shallow zones.The report also discusses tentative plans to add nearly 350 million cubic meters of surface storage and 80 aquifer storage and recovery wells around Lake Okeechobee. That would help managers control water levels, notes ecologist Paul Gray, science coordinator for Audubon Florida’s Everglades restoration program in Lorida, who was not on the report committee. But competing demands on the water supply from communities, agriculture around the lake, and the wetlands to the south could complicate the management efforts, he says. “We are trying to restore a whole ecosystem, not just move the harm from one part of the ecosystem to another.” Efforts to restore the rich ecology of the Florida Everglades have so far focused on fighting damage from pollutant runoff and reestablishing the natural flow of water. But now, an expert panel is calling for federal and state agencies to reassess their plans in light of threats from climate change and sea-level rise. A congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, released on 16 October, asks the managers of the 18-year-old Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) to conduct a “midcourse assessment.” The new evaluation should account for likely conditions in the wetlands in “2050 and beyond” and model how existing restoration projects would fare under various sea-level rise scenarios.“I use the analogy of a hockey player,” says environmental economist William Boggess at Oregon State University in Corvallis, who is chair of the panel behind the new report. “Maybe we should be skating to where the puck is going to be rather than where it is right now.”The Everglades watershed once included more than 1 million hectares of wetlands, sawgrass plains, and tree islands across southern Florida, but agriculture and human settlement have shrunk that habitat by half. Phosphorus from agricultural runoff has killed sawgrass that thrives in the Everglades’ naturally low-phosphorus conditions. In its place, dense cattail habitats have sprung up, choking off water access for animals and birds. Eighty plant and animal species in the larger region are now threatened or endangered. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Richard BlausteinOct. 19, 2018 , 12:15 PM Scott Leslie/Minden Pictures center_img Climate change prompts a rethink of Everglades management Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

pxhvjbbu

This may be the most distant object in our solar system

first_imgRoberto Molar Candanosa/Carnegie Institution for Science Astronomers today announced the discovery of the solar system’s most distant resident, a tiny dwarf planet located at a distance 120 times farther than Earth is from the sun. The planet, given the provisional designation 2018 VG18 and nicknamed “Farout” by its discovery team, is pinkish in hue, reflecting an icy composition, and is likely some 500 kilometers in diameter.Scientists first spotted Farout, seen above in an artist’s conception, with the Japanese Subaru 8-meter telescope located atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii on 10 November. It was confirmed this month during a week of observations from the Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Like the recent “Goblin” planet, astronomers spotted Farout while searching for a hypothesized ninth giant planet.Farout’s orbit, however, is not yet known, so researchers can’t yet say whether its path, which likely takes more than 1000 years to swing around the sun, hints at gravitational tugs from the hypothetical Planet Nine—or even a 10th planet. This may be the most distant object in our solar systemcenter_img By Paul VoosenDec. 17, 2018 , 11:45 AMlast_img read more

pxhvjbbu

New way of crafting crystals could speed up flexible electronics

first_img New way of crafting crystals could speed up flexible electronics By Robert F. ServiceApr. 11, 2019 , 2:00 PM To make the ultrathin crystalline films used in everything from solar cells to solid state lasers, materials scientists must use complex, expensive machines to lay them down one atomic layer at a time. These techniques craft films into a single crystal without the breaks or defects that would disrupt their electronic and optical properties. But more often, manufacturers use a cheap technique to spin liquids into smooth films, which harden after they are applied to a surface. These coated films rarely form a single crystal, making them serviceable, but inferior.Now, researchers report today in Science that they can “supersaturate” these liquids with precursor compounds, so that as they spin, they form multiple crystals that fuse together into one, unbroken crystal (seen above in an alloy of cesium, lead, and bromine). The new approach, they suggest, could improve light harvesting in solar cell materials called perovskites and ramp up the speed and performance of flexible electronic devices integrated into everything from curved car dashboards to fabrics.center_img Kelso et al./Science last_img read more

pxhvjbbu

Amazon Meshes With Eero

first_imgBoth companies should benefit from their pooling of resources.”The deal gives Amazon access to well regarded and established WiFi products and a knowledgeable developer team,” Pund-IT’s King said.”It should enhance a range of network-connected Amazon products, too, including its Alexa-enabled devices,” he added.Most routers don’t do a good job of covering a home, Gold explained, “so Amazon had the choice of developing their own mesh router system or going and buying one. They decided it’s just easier to go buy one.”As Amazon continues to increase its streaming services, home networks will get overloaded, he noted.”You can have high-speed Internet coming into your house, but if you don’t have a high-speed network within your home, then that becomes a problem,” Gold observed. Privacy Issue Can’t Be Ignored News of the acquisition received a cold reception from some Eero owners. Despite Eero support’s tweeted assurances that Amazon takes customer privacy seriously, and that “Eero does not track customers’ Internet activity and this policy will not change with the acquisition,” some users were skeptical.”I refuse to believe that @amazon is barred from snooping on our traffic in perpetuity,” tweeted Aaron Scott. “The data will eventually be too valuable to pass up. I would never have bought a router built by Amazon and yet now my house is full of them….””This is terrible news for my privacy concerns,” wrote Steve Riggins. “I don’t let Alexa in my house for those reasons and now you back doored me. Do we get refunds?”He added later: “You should also understand that something like our data, we entrusted to you. Not Amazon. This is no small matter for some of us, but we are likely the few. You brought someone into my home I did not invite.”The acquisition was “horrible news,” according to Keith Chirayus.”Good thing my one year Eero plus subscription is coming to an end,” he wrote. “Time to look for a new router solution.”Tom Stack suggested that Eero was being naive about Amazon’s commitment to data privacy.”We should get eerosupport a new birth certificate as they must have been born yesterday,” he wrote. Distrust of Amazon High-Performance WiFi To optimize wireless coverage of a home network, Eero uses multiple access points. The system can be customized to eliminate “dead spots” often found in traditional WiFi networks in order to deliver high performance and reliable networking throughout a home.A system can be set up in less than 10 minutes with the easy-to-use Eero app, according to Amazon.What’s more, Eero automatically communicates with its servers in the cloud, so it’s continually updating, fixing and improving itself without human intervention.”From the beginning, Eero’s mission has been to make the technology in homes just work,” said Nick Weaver, the company’s CEO.”We started with WiFi because it’s the foundation of the modern home,” he continued. “Every customer deserves reliable and secure WiFi in every room.””By joining the Amazon family, we’re excited to learn from and work closely with a team that is defining the future of the home, accelerate our mission, and bring Eero systems to more customers around the globe,” Weaver said. Table Stakes for Smart Homecenter_img Amazon has scooped up mesh WiFi network maker Eero, the home network company known for making an easy-to-set-up product that can blanket a home with high-quality WiFi.Amazon announced the deal Monday night but did not disclose any financial details.”We are incredibly impressed with the Eero team and how quickly they invented a WiFi solution that makes connected devices just work,” said Dave Limp, Amazon’s senior vice president for devices and services. “We have a shared vision that the smart home experience can get even easier, and we’re committed to continue innovating on behalf of customers.” Concerns about Amazon undermining Eero’s privacy policies are not warranted, suggested Jack E. Gold, principal analyst at J.Gold Associates, an IT advisory company in Northborough, Massachusetts.”Amazon already knows everything it needs to know about you,” he told TechNewsWorld.After all, it runs the biggest online store, so chances are it has lots of data on what an individual buys, what they search for, and if they leave the site because they can’t find a product.”What this does is make Amazon’s service to the consumer better,” Gold said. “That’s where the play is.”Nevertheless, the privacy issue, whether real or perceived, should not be ignored, maintained Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT, a technology advisory firm in Hayward, California.”Given the outcry on social media prompted by the deal, it’s a subject that Amazon needs to take very seriously,” he told TechNewsWorld. “If not, privacy concerns could negatively impact Eero sales, negating much of the acquisition’s monetary and strategic value.” Acquiring Eero gives Amazon a hedge on the future smart home and office market.”Effective, easy to use WiFi technologies could become table stakes for any company hoping to compete in the smart home and office markets,” Gold suggested.”You could say that Amazon is fairly late to the game since both Google and Apple already have WiFi products of their own, so it makes good sense for Amazon to get into the game,” he added.Meanwhile, Eero should be happy with the deal, too.”The company founders and shareholding employees likely made a nice piece of change,” King observed. “Plus, I expect Amazon will work hard to preserve the product development and engineering team.”Eero probably can expect its shipment numbers to increase, too.”If Amazon is doing the distribution, they can expect to sell a lot more devices than they could have sold on their own,” Gold pointed out.Since mesh networks are expensive — a three-unit Eero net retails for nearly US$500 — consumers aren’t rushing to install them. Amazon may decide to address that problem, too.”I wouldn’t be surprised if Amazon copies the cable companies and rents these systems to consumers for a low monthly fee,” Gold predicted, “or find a way to fold the payments into Amazon Prime.” John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John. Amazon Needs Mesh Offeringlast_img read more

pxhvjbbu

CDCs Systemic Review analyzes HIVrelated stigma among US healthcare providers

first_img Source:https://home.liebertpub.com/news/cdc-researchers-examine-hiv-related-stigma-among-us-healthcare-providers/2444 Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 10 2018A Systemic Review from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed studies of HIV-related stigma among healthcare provider and identified three main themes: attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors; quality of patient care; and education and training. The CDC researchers found that factors associated with HIV-related stigma varied by gender, race, category of provider, and type of clinical setting, according to the study results reported in AIDS Patient Care and STDs, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The full-text article is available free on the AIDS Patient Care and STDs website through November 5, 2018 at https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/apc.2018.0114.Related StoriesApplication of machine learning methods to healthcare outcomes researchHIV persists in spinal fluid even after long-term treatment and is linked to cognitive deficitsStudy: HIV patients continue treatments if health care providers are compassionateIn the article entitled “HIV-Related Stigma by Healthcare Providers in the United States: A Systematic Reviewv,” coauthors Angelica Geter, Adrienne Herron, and Madeline Sutton, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, examined HIV-related stigma by healthcare providers for the purposes of applying their findings to the development of stigma-reduction interventions for healthcare providers in the U.S.Among their findings, the researchers reported that stigma can be manifested through inadvertent behaviors and beliefs, such as homophobia, transphobia, racism, and negative views of people who inject drugs. This can create a barrier to HIV prevention, treatment, and care, whereas less stigmatizing attitudes by providers can help reduce social and structural barriers to HIV care across the care continuum. More overt HIV-related stigma may manifest as providers who take extreme precautionary measures during routine examinations, use of stigmatizing language, and even denial of necessary services or treatment.”Most prior studies have focused on the importance of HIV stigma related to family, friends, and personal communities, and how it may prevent an individual from getting tested, seeking treatment, or continuing in HIV care. This study focuses on stigmatizing factors among health care providers themselves,” says Editor-in-Chief Jeffrey Laurence, MD, Professor of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY.last_img read more

pxhvjbbu

Study of older women shows link between frequent persistent back pain and

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 7 2018Researchers at Boston Medical Center found that frequent, persistent back pain is associated with earlier death in a study of more than 8,000 older women who were followed for an average of 14 years. After controlling for important sociodemographic and health factors, women who reported frequent, persistent back pain had a 24 percent increased risk of death compared to women with no back pain. Published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine,Back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide, and women aged 40-80 years have the highest prevalence of back pain. Also, women report more frequent and debilitating back pain compared to men. The proportion of adults over the age of 65 is increasing rapidly in the United States, and optimizing physical health in order to extend life for older adults is a well-documented public health goal.”To our knowledge, our study is the first to measure disability after measurement of back pain. This allowed for a prospective analysis of back pain that persisted over time and later rates of disability, which may help explain the association between back pain and mortality,” said Eric Roseen, DC, MSc, a research fellow at Boston Medical Center and leading author of the study. “Our findings raise the question of whether better management of back pain across the lifespan could prevent disability, improve quality of life, and ultimately extend life.”After taking baseline measurements of back pain, researchers followed up with participants two years later and measured back pain again. In year four, participants were asked about and observed doing common activities of daily living. The study found that disability following the measurements of back pain explained much of the association with mortality.Related StoriesCannabis users could be more tolerant to anesthesia agentsStudy shows potential culprit behind LupusCancer mortality at an all time low finds reportSpecifically, difficulty performing one or more basic daily activities, like walking short distances or meal preparation, explained nearly half (47 percent) of the effect of frequent persistent back pain on mortality. Slow performance on more objective measures, like observed walking speed or repetitive standing up from a chair, each explained about a fourth of this association (27 percent and 24 percent, respectively). Of 8,321 women in the study, 56 percent died over a median follow up of 14.1 years. A higher proportion of women with frequent persistent back pain died (65.8 percent) than those with no back pain (53.5 percent).While the study’s findings are consistent with prior studies that found older women with daily or disabling back pain had elevated mortality risk, why this association occurs remains unclear.”Back pain may directly impair daily activities, but older adults could inappropriately avoid them due to fear of re-injury or worsening of symptoms. Being unable to perform, or avoiding, daily activities could lead to weight gain, development or progression of other chronic health conditions, and ultimately earlier death,” said Roseen.These results lay the foundation for future studies to assess the long-term impact of back pain treatments and self-care strategies. Clinicians should assess physical function in older adults with back pain and recommend guideline-based management, which encourages use of less invasive treatments.Source: http://www.bmc.org/news/press-releases/2018/11/06/back-pain-shows-significant-association-mortality-among-older-womenlast_img read more